My Blog

Posts for: April, 2014

By Joseph & Nina Zeigler, DMD, PC
April 24, 2014
Category: Oral Health
WhatisPediatricConsciousSedation

In dentistry (as well as other branches of medicine) pediatric conscious sedation is becoming more widespread than ever — but some people aren’t yet familiar with this beneficial therapy. Conscious sedation can remove anxiety and produce a feeling of calm and relaxation during dental treatment; however, unlike general anesthesia, it doesn’t cause the loss of consciousness. That means patients can still breathe normally and can respond to certain stimuli, while feelings of pain and anxiety are blocked.

Conscious sedation is often employed for invasive procedures such as tooth extractions or root canals — which cause some people a great deal of apprehension, no matter what their age. It can be especially useful for children, however, who may have a more limited ability to understand (and cooperate with) their dental treatment. Because the medications are commonly administered orally (by mouth), there’s no needle to provoke fear. And when it’s over, there is usually little or no memory of the procedure that was done.

Pediatric conscious sedation is typically administered in an office setting by a dentist with special qualifications. The American Dental Association, the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry, and the American Academy of Pediatrics have jointly established criteria for its use. Specialized training and continuing education are part of the qualification process; additionally, the dental office must be equipped with advanced life-support equipment and trained staff, who can help in the unlikely case of an emergency.

While your child is receiving conscious sedation, he or she will be monitored by a designated staff member who keeps a close watch on vital signs like blood pressure, oxygen levels, pulse rate and respiration. This helps to ensure that the level of sedation remains safe, yet effective. When the procedure is over, the medications wear off quickly; however, children will certainly need a ride home, and shouldn’t return to school until the next day.

As new medications are developed, more dentists receive special training, and the cost of associated equipment becomes more reasonable, the practice of pediatric conscious sedation is becoming more widespread. For many kids, it could mean the difference between having fearful childhood memories of the dental office that linger on through life — and remembering almost nothing at all.

If your child has dental anxiety or requires invasive procedures, pediatric conscious sedation may be a good option for you to consider. For more information, call our office to arrange a consultation. You can learn more in the Dear Doctor magazine article “Sedation Dentistry for Kids.”


By Joseph & Nina Zeigler, DMD, PC
April 09, 2014
Category: Dental Procedures
MatthewLewisAdultOrthodontics

If you haven't seen a recent picture of Matthew Lewis, the actor who played Neville Longbottom in all eight Harry Potter movies, you may be in for a surprise: It seems the plump, awkward teenager from Gryffindor has been magically transformed into a post-Hogwarts hunk. What kind of wizardry did it take to change his memorably snarled teeth into a leading man's sparkly smile? The kind skilled cosmetic dentists perform every day!

While special effects created some of the character's dental disarray, the actor's own teeth were far from perfect. And, as Lewis recently noted, the film studio urged him to postpone cosmetic dental work until the movies were all done. “It was something I'd always wanted to do, but it would have meant me wearing a brace for two years,” he told an interviewer with the Yorkshire Evening Post. “Warner Brothers said if I put it off until we'd finished filming they'd pay for it — and they did.”

There are plenty of people, like the twenty-something actor, who put off orthodontic treatment until after their teen years. If you're wondering whether there's still time to get orthodontic work done, then take heart — it's never too late to straighten your teeth!

Today, an estimated twenty percent of orthodontic patients are adults. Compliance with the orthodontic program (meaning thorough regular brushing and flossing, wearing elastics, etc.) is often less of an issue with adults than with teens. Plus, there are some options that can help ensure your orthodontic appliances will fit in with a more mature image.

One is colorless braces. In this system, the brackets (the parts that are bonded to the front teeth and hold the archwire) are made of a clear ceramic material that blends in with the tooth's natural color. This makes them hard to see unless you look closely. Inconspicuous yet effective, clear braces have been the first choice of many celebrities, such as Tom Cruise and Faith Hill... and lots of “regular” adults too.

Another option is lingual braces. These are truly invisible, because they attach behind the teeth (on the tongue side) instead of in front. They work just like the standard braces, and they're appropriate in many situations. However their cost is higher, and the space they occupy in the mouth may take the wearer a bit of time to get used to.

A third option is clear aligners. Unlike braces, which aren't normally removed until orthodontic treatment is nearly complete, clear aligners are easily removable. They consist of a series of transparent trays made of special plastic, which are worn over the teeth 22 hours per day. Each tray in the series is worn for a few weeks, and each moves the teeth a small amount; all together, they can accomplish a big change.

Aligners work well for correcting mild to moderate malocclusion (bite problems). Plus, you can temporarily remove them for important social occasions. But best of all, they're virtually undetectable — so whether or not you play the role of a wizard in the movies, you won't need a magic spell to make them invisible!

Which option is right for you? That's something we would be happy to discuss. If you would like more information about adult orthodontic treatment, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can learn more by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Orthodontics for the Older Adult.”